Mississippi Flyway Used by Half of All North American Birds! Hear more next Monday…

Lake County Audubon Society welcomes all to attend a very important presentation on Monday, December 2, 7:30 pm, at the Libertyville Village Hall, 118 W. Cook Street, Libertyville, IL.

Chris Canfield, Vice President of the Mississippi Flyway and former VP Gulf of Mexico Conservation and Restoration, will discuss the National Audubon Society’s Mississippi Flyway, the role it plays in Audubon’s integrated conservation model, and the essential role that local Audubon chapters play in advancing National Audubon’s conservation priorities and success stories for birds.

Audubon is proud to have played a role in making a difference in the restoration plan that followed the Gulf oil spill as well as “working on the diverse team that helped make the RESTORE Act a reality [Queen Bee says: This act wisely gave all the BP money back to the Gulf instead of the US Treasury.] “ That funding will help revive vital wetlands that have been mismanaged for years as well as supporting a “river of birds,” since about half of North American species use the Mississippi Flyway at one time or another.

QUEEN BEE SAYS:  OPEN this link and LISTEN to this bird! http://birds.audubon.org/birds/greater-prairie-chicken. Wouldn’t you just die if a prairie chicken (a bird that counts on a healthy Mississippi and no bullets. Ahem.) was outside in your yard making his crazy noises?!

Greater_Prairie-Chicken_l07-50-097_l_1

Canfield did his undergraduate work at Birmingham-Southern College in Alabama and graduate work at the University of Oxford in England, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. Until September 2010, he was executive director of Audubon North Carolina, a National Audubon Society program he led for more than a decade.

All along its length, the river has been controlled and manipulated to the detriment of natural systems and the birds and other wildlife that depend on them. The upper river is governed by a series of dams and locks; the lower river is channeled by more than 1,600 miles of levees. Together, these structures confine the Mississippi to less than 10 percent of its original floodplain, and the sediment that historically fed the river’s vast delta in Louisiana no longer reaches marshes and coastal forests. As a result, 19 square miles of delta wetlands disappear each year.

But Audubon is making a difference for the birds, habitats, and communities of the Mississippi Flyway.

Support Audubon. These people (mostly volunteers) do great work! ## PS And turn off all the damn floodlights in your buildings and yard. Birds do not read books.
 

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection, Events, Uncategorized

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