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Saving Sea Turtles by Improving Shrimp Boat Nets

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection, Politics of Conservation, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Faithful readers of The Weedpatch Gazette will recall that I’ve veered away from plants and land conservation several times to write about how to save endangered sea turtles. I get especially passionate about this issue when we visit the Florida Keys. A stop in Marathon to see (maimed) turtles at The Turtle Hospital will make you realize that there can be a big downside to a day on a motorboat or eating a big plate of shrimp.

Boats, pollution from sewage (yes, it’s true, the Florida Keys are JUST NOW stopping their sewage from going into the ocean), and plastic bottles and grocery bags kill and maim these incredible creatures. The Atlantic Ocean is home to five out of the seven of the world’s species of sea turtles. All five are endangered–in danger of no longer breeding or living in the ocean. Can you imagine our lives without sea turtles?

Enter the National Marine Fisheries Service–which is part of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) which is part of the U.S. Dept of Commerce. Commerce will likely soon be headed by Wilbur Ross, billionaire steel- and shipping investor who will preside over, ahem, trade deals. This not only means issues like the TPP, but also Japan, Iceland, and Norway’s fishing of whales and our research on weather, climate science, melting ice, rising seas, and yes, sea turtles.

Last week the National Marine Fisheries Service at long last issued a proposed rule updating a proposed rule issued in 2012 (!) which was developed as a result of settling a lawsuit filed by several groups: the Center for Biological Diversity, Turtle Island Restoration Network, Sea Turtle Conservancy and Defenders of Wildlife. The lawsuit was filed after 3,500 turtles turned up injured or dead in the Gulf of Mexico in the year after the BP Oil Spill (April, 2010). [See below]

By law all but one group of American ocean-fishing shrimp boats must use TED nets. (Imported shrimp must also prove that their boats use TEDs.) The new proposal would include those boats currently exempted: shrimp boats that fish in bays and estuaries. Instead of using TED nets, these boats limited the amount of time they fished, but that time restriction on them appears not to have helped the turtles enough. The turtles died en masse.

While I think most fishermen want to do right by animals even at some cost to themselves, I hope that the shrimp boat owners in shallower waters don’t put up a big stink and derail the rule. It’s possible though. Here’s the backstory as described in a 2010 article in the NYTimes describing the massive deaths of sea turtles not long after the BP Oil Spill:

Shrimpers emerged as a prime suspect in the NOAA investigation when, after a round of turtle necropsies in early May, Dr. Stacy announced that more than half the carcasses had sediment in the airways or lungs — evidence of drowning. The only plausible explanation for such a high number of drowning deaths, he said, was, as he put it, “fisheries interaction.”

Environmentalists saw the findings as confirmation of their suspicions that shrimpers, taking advantage of the fact that the Coast Guard and other inspectors were busy with the oil spill, had disabled their turtle excluder devices.

The devices are so contentious that Louisiana law has long forbidden its wildlife and fisheries agents to enforce federal regulations on the devices. Last month, Gov. Bobby Jindal vetoed legislation that would have finally lifted the ban, citing the “challenges and issues currently facing our fishermen.” By contrast, Mississippi officials strengthened turtle protections by decreasing the allowable tow time for skimmers, posting observers on boats, and sending out pamphlets on turtle resuscitation.

Officials in both states say that turtles die in shrimp season even when shrimpers follow the law, from boat strikes and other accidents. They also say there have been far fewer shrimpers working since the spill, in part because many have hired out their boats to BP. That should mean fewer, not more, turtle deaths.

But there has also been illegal activity. In Louisiana, agents have seized more than 20,000 pounds of shrimp and issued more than 350 citations to commercial fishermen working in waters closed because of the oil spill. In Mississippi in June, three skimmer boats were caught exceeding legal tow times — one just hours after the shrimper had been given a handout explaining that the maximum time had been reduced, Lieutenant Armes said.

As for the piece of shrimp that Dr. Stacy found lodged in the turtle’s throat during the necropsy, it, too, pointed to shrimpers. A turtle is normally not quick enough to catch shrimp, Dr. Stacy said. Unless, of course, it is caught in a net with them.”

Please let NOAA Fisheries know by Feb 14 what you think of the rule (even if all you do is send them a link to this article). Please also do all you can to encourage conservative businessman Wilbur Ross to approve it. Maybe send him your message in a plastic water bottle?

A sea turtle will thank you…##

Here’s how the new net that releases turtles, sharks and other large animals works:

Hosta and Heifers: We Salute Margaret Eyre…”our” ambassador of world peace.

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Gardeners & Designers, Plants, Social Impact of Horticulture, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Can you imagine being thanked by an international organization for helping to end hunger and poverty and care for the Earth?

margareteyre

That is the story of Margaret Eyre, who died recently at age 97. John and I had the remarkable luck of knowing Margaret for twenty years, meeting her not long after she became active in her son, Rich Eyre’s, business, Rich’s Foxwillow Pines Nursery, in Woodstock, Illinois.  Her specialty was hostas and she propagated the plants and sold them for Heifer International. She raised at least $500,000 for world hunger, allowing Heifer to buy farm animals for people around the world with the agreement that those farmers would give what they received and pass on the gift to others in their community.  Some of those funds were donated to Heifer International Foundation, where the funds remain in perpetuity and the interest is given to projects in Ghana, Mozambique, Rwanda, Haiti, and Bolivia.

Margaret was known as the ‘Hosta Queen’.  Margaret was thrilled when Tom Micheletti, former president of the American Hosta Society, hybridized a hosta and named it ‘Margaret Eyre’.  She worked every day at the nursery until she was 93 years old.

On December 21, 2015 with admiration and recognition, Mano a Mano International presented Margaret with a plaque for a 4-classroom school in Sora Sora, Bolivia, dedicated in her honor for her years of work on behalf of the people of Bolivia. This school will be completed by April 2016. Here’s the old school that Margaret’s hosta money will replace:

Bolivia old school

Thank you, Margaret, and thank you to all who bought Margaret’s hostas and, in so doing, contributed to BEAUTY AND PEACE ON EARTH. Margaret was a rare and wondrous bird. She will truly be greatly missed.#

Margaret-Eyre

 

 

Whoa…just how would we protect the habitat of a butterfly?

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Birds, Bugs & Butterflies, Environmental Protection, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

This situation with Monarch butterflies is serious and getting serious-er. And just imagine if our Presidential candidates have to express their views on it? The Donald might propose building a wall, but it would be a beautiful wall…maybe orange and black stripes?

http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/news/2016/jan/enviro-groups-push-feds-on-monarch-butterfly-protections

Second Snow

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

How can you not like snow when it blankets the trees in white? So beautiful…so quiet…there’s peace. On earth.

IMG_7770

 

 

Brussels Sprouted…into a topiary!

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Plants, Social Impact of Horticulture, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Thanks to Chicago Botanic Garden veggie garden manager Lisa Hilgenberg for sending us a photo of her Brussels Sprouts topiary, which she says was inspired by chefs at The White House. (Recently Lisa was a special guest for a tour of the First Lady’s organic garden and the White House kitchen(s)(s)(s). How cool is that?)…

Brussel Sprout topiary

It’s a lovely thing, this topiary, and it makes me happy to look at a thing of beauty because I was just watching TV news. Another gun massacre. Which means another call to Mark Kirk, who I called this morning to say that Mitch McConnell cancelling health money for the 9/11 first responders is shameful. And I spent all day finding new health insurance (which I didn’t finish yet because I can’t figure it out) because my $900/month Gold Blue Cross policy is now useless at all Northwestern hospitals and “out of network” at Rush (check your policy if you go to Rush). Grumpy? YES, I AM, aren’t you? Makes me want to throw a Brussels Sprout at a Republican.##

Brussel Sprouts or Brussels Sprouts?

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in My Gardens, Plants, Uncategorized | 6 Comments

When I was 21, my Aunt Rita and my Mom (Aunt Susie to my cousins) gave me a backyard picnic party. I was thrilled to see the long-stemmed rose box, tied with a big red ribbon, since no boy had yet seen fit to present long-stemmed roses to me. So imagine my giddiness, then shock, then dismay when I opened the box to find a long-stemmed Brussel (Brussels?) Sprout plant. HaHa. Not funny.

Fast forward forty years and here I am, picking Brussel (Brussels?) Sprouts from our garden in time to roast them for Thanksgiving.

Brussels Sprouts 11-15-2015 1-13-10 PM 4000x3000

If you want the history, I recommend an interesting website: foodtimeline.org. Here you will find the dates of cultivation of Brussels Sprouts (yes, the Romans carted them north, but the Persians and Afghans had them first, then across the pond to Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello by 1812) right next to important dates in the history of…my favorite vegetable…brownies.

What I now know from reading Sprout History is that those that write “Brussel” instead of “Brussels” don’t know nuthin’ bout Sprout Geography. Then again, the Crusaders are once again to blame. They stole and renamed the sprout. We are really eating, “Babylon Balls” or some such.

I made some Brussel(s) Sprouts for Thanksgiving (not a big seller) and so there are more in the refrigerator. Here’s two “slaw” recipes in case you are in the same bucket.

http://www.greenkitchenstories.com/shaved-brussels-sprout-christmas-salad/

http://fromthelandweliveon.com/brussels-sprout-cranberry-salad/

Cold and gray today. Almost December… ##

September. Already?

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in My Gardens, Uncategorized | 5 Comments

Man, time flies. And so many projects (ie dividing Iris, dividing everything, cleaning garage) are left undone, again this year. But I just had to go for a walk with Daughter #2 who snapped this great photo…

Pioneer Road barns 9-6-2015 1-46-53 PM

It was also important to create a feast (salad Nicoise) using our own “farm farsh” eggs. Alas, the black olives and string beans for the salad were not from our garden, but the broccoli and Brussels sprouts and herbs and tomatoes were. It’s been a lousy year for all tomatoes but those zinnias–magnifique–the best year ever!

 

Zinnias and beans 9-6-2015 8-26-42 AM

And I even managed to make peach preserves yesterday.

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Happy Labor Day! Here comes Fall..#

 

 

Landscape’s Loss

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Gardeners & Designers, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

It is a sad day in Chicago landscape history, for internationally-known landscape architect Peter Schaudt, 56, died on July 19. Peter was co-partner in the firm [Doug] Hoerr Schaudt. Here is his obituary, written by Chicago Tribune architecture critic, Blair Kamin.

Blair also wrote a story back in 2011 when Doug’s prairie at Trump Tower in Chicago was ripped out after just one year and replaced with a more conventional garden. It’s wasteful and always shocking to me just how often one designer’s work gets tossed. A sad phenomenon.

Peter was a very great talent. Chicago should be very proud to have had him as our’s.#20150727-peter

 

 

Look but Don’t Touch

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Plants, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

I know, I know, dear readers, that I have been absent from writing since April. And even today I am only given you un petit soupcon of a post. Here’s our lovely vegetable garden showing off broccoli and lettuce, but alas, there’s been too much humidity and rain to actually garden in it. But tonight, tonight, we will be consuming some of that lettuce–planted back in April when I should have been writing to you. All my best. It’s a rain forest out there… Rommy

Richmond Veggie Garden

Migrations North

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Birds, Bugs & Butterflies, Plants, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

During Monday’s blizzard (!), I glanced outside and a flash of orange caught my eye. There were two Robins, poor dears, hunkered down in the Honeylocust tree closest to the bird feeders. This reminded me of the day, several years ago, when I looked out at the Christmas-green-filled containers on our front terrace where dozens (and I do mean, dozens) of Robins were feasting on the shrivelled Winterberry [Ilex verticillata] berries. The next day, we had a terrible terrible cold snap with snow. I called my husband’s aged uncle–a retired surgeon but also an amazing birder who in his lifetime saw every specie of North American bird but two–and asked him what he thought might have happened to all those Robins as a result of the sudden cold. Pity me for asking such a question of a surgeon with no “bedside manner”. With no hesitation, he said, “They probably all died”. Body blow.

But I digress. Journey North is a really interesting website which has an app allowing us to record our first sightings of Robins, Butterflies, Hummingbirds, Frogs, Earthworms and many other creatures. Check it out. Love the maps!#

Winterberry (Ilex verticillata)

Winterberry (Ilex verticillata)

 

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