Welcome! My favorite part of this blog is the interactive aspect of it. Double click on the blue title boxes to view the full article and the social media section. That's where you can share, tweet, pin, and best of all, COMMENT. I like comments!

Open Days this Sunday for Gardens in Lake Forest, Highland Park, and Winnetka

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Events, Gardeners & Designers, Historic Places, Landscape Architecture, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days program – June 23:

On Sunday, June 23rd, make plans to become inspired by five private gardens in Highland Park, Lake Forest, and Winnetka, opening to the public to benefit the Garden Conservancy, a national non-profit whose mission is to preserve exceptional American gardens across the country. Admission is $5 per garden and children 12 & under are free. No reservations needed, tours are self-guided, and are rain or shine. Visit www.opendaysprogram.org or call toll-free weekdays, 888-842-2442.

The two Lake Forest gardens are NOT TO BE MISSED. Incredible: one of them has a grape arbor said to date back to Frederick Law Olmsted. Visitors will see modern and classical sculpture within the landscapes, classical garden arches creating a passage through a parterre, enclosed garden rooms, a topiary garden, views of Lake Michigan, a garden designed by Rosemary Verey, colored waves of native plants, and the ancient precision of labyrinth geometry.
Fairlawn Arbor

2-CIMG6899

Additional area Open Days will take place on July 21 in Elburn and West Chicago; and July 28th in Lake Forest and Mettawa – mark your calendars!

A Few News Briefs…

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Conservation and Ecology, Gardeners & Designers, Historic Places, Landscape Architecture, Plants, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Having grown up in Weston, Connecticut, there are a few East Coast preferences that I will never shake. One is the New York Times. I read it assiduously. So from time to time I’ll post some news and/or links that gardeners, conservationists, environmentalists (yes there is a diff between conservationists and environmentalists), land use planners, and whoever else is reading this blog might be interested in. And please, comment or write a follow up article…this blog is not supposed to be just the Queen Bee sounding off. It is here to exchange information, questions, and great commentary (emphasis on “great”).

Here are some snippets:

  • Sally Jewell is the new 51st Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior. Who, you ask? Sally Jewell, 57 (young!) former CEO of REI, an outfitting store that is hard not to like. Jewell has no political experience, but she is a mountain climber so that bodes well for running an agency in Washington DC with 70,000 (!) employees, an $11B budget, and stewardship of 20% of the land in the U.S.. Why are you, a mere backyard gardener or landscape professional, interested in Interior? Because the US Fish and Wildlife Service in 2012 designated the country’s newest National Wildlife Refuge, called “Hackmatack”, in McHenry County and overlapping towards Lake Geneva, WI.. You are also interested because Interior administers the Endangered Species Act (thanks to Tricky Dick Nixon, 1973). Also, Interior regulates the private leasing of our national lands for oil wells and the like (pipelines). And it sells Duck Stamps (thanks to Herbert Hoover, 1929) to duck hunters, which raised $700 million for wetland conservation in 2013. Interior makes a difference in each of our lives.
  • Columbus, Indiana, is an “unlikely trove of midcentury modernism”. Oh, how I want to make a road trip here and see not only 70 examples of great architecture, but great landscape architecture. For example, you can tour the 1957 house designed by Eero Saarinaan and Kevin Roche [oooh, a fuchsia conversation pit!] but the gardens designed by landscape architect Dan Kiley. Alas, the Monet water lilies that was in this house was sold in 2008 for $40 million. Did any of you happen to purchase it?
  • A future post will cover the gardening impact of 400 ppm CO2 levels. We know we must plant trees and more trees, but should we be burying the dead ones instead of chipping, burning, or letting them lie on the ground to disintegrate? The latter options are ways to accelerate the release of more carbon. What do you think?

Anywho, this NYTimes article explains that average worldwide warming has now been proved to be 5 degrees, warmer over land (such as Chicago) and even higher at the Poles (15 degrees). Actually, a 2008 article about weeds loving CO2 (REQUIRED READING!) says that the average city condition NOW compared to the suburban temperature is exactly what is predicted worldwide…. This is what I know. There is no question that Santa is shaving his beard cause he’s too hot: the NYTimes reports that in 2010, only four ships carrying 110,000 tons of cargo made the northern passage between Asia and Europe. In 2012, 46 did, carrying 1.3 million tons. Less ice? Scary.##

 

 

 

 

Last Minute Garden Snoop Event…

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Historic Places, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Oh, if you can re-arrange your whole life to attend the Rare Breeds show at Garfield Farm Museum (west of St. Charles) on this Sunday, by all means you should do so. If you love animals, you will love this show. The show features some kind of Colorado Mountain horse that is the prettiest thing I ever saw. I’m going to try and go to this show because our farm really really needs some new chickens (we now only have one, poor lonesome hen) and Garfield is where Black Java chickens were bred back into existence. Besides, if you’ve never been to Garfield, you don’t know nuthin’ about Chicago and you should be ashamed of yourself!

newinn

Here’s what Jerry Johnson, Exec Dir of Garfield, informs: “Staff and volunteers have been busy setting up for Sunday’s Rare Breeds Livestock & Poultry Show. Over 27 exhibitors plan to come and there will be lectures and demonstrations on Lippitt Morgans, dog sheep herding, and sheep shearing. The schedule for lectures and demos is as follows:

Gate Opens: 11:00 AM    Lunch by Inglenook Pantry
Tours of the Inn: 12-4 PM
Sheep shearing: 11:30 am until done.
Demos/Talks 11:30:am   Lippitt Morgan demo
12:00 pm    Dog sheep herding
12:30 pm    Lippitt Morgan demo
1:00 pm     Dog sheep herding
1:30 pm    Lippitt Morgan Lecture (1842 Barn)
1:30 pm     Ox Driving in Paddock
2:00 pm     Dog sheep herding
2:30 pm      Lippitt Morgan Lecture (1842 Barn)
3 & 3:30 pm    Dog sheep herding

MAKE THE EFFORT. YOU WILL NOT BE DISAPPOINTED.##