Welcome! My favorite part of this blog is the interactive aspect of it. Double click on the blue title boxes to view the full article and the social media section. That's where you can share, tweet, pin, and best of all, COMMENT. I like comments!

Saving Sea Turtles by Improving Shrimp Boat Nets

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection, Politics of Conservation, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Faithful readers of The Weedpatch Gazette will recall that I’ve veered away from plants and land conservation several times to write about how to save endangered sea turtles. I get especially passionate about this issue when we visit the Florida Keys. A stop in Marathon to see (maimed) turtles at The Turtle Hospital will make you realize that there can be a big downside to a day on a motorboat or eating a big plate of shrimp.

Boats, pollution from sewage (yes, it’s true, the Florida Keys are JUST NOW stopping their sewage from going into the ocean), and plastic bottles and grocery bags kill and maim these incredible creatures. The Atlantic Ocean is home to five out of the seven of the world’s species of sea turtles. All five are endangered–in danger of no longer breeding or living in the ocean. Can you imagine our lives without sea turtles?

Enter the National Marine Fisheries Service–which is part of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) which is part of the U.S. Dept of Commerce. Commerce will likely soon be headed by Wilbur Ross, billionaire steel- and shipping investor who will preside over, ahem, trade deals. This not only means issues like the TPP, but also Japan, Iceland, and Norway’s fishing of whales and our research on weather, climate science, melting ice, rising seas, and yes, sea turtles.

Last week the National Marine Fisheries Service at long last issued a proposed rule updating a proposed rule issued in 2012 (!) which was developed as a result of settling a lawsuit filed by several groups: the Center for Biological Diversity, Turtle Island Restoration Network, Sea Turtle Conservancy and Defenders of Wildlife. The lawsuit was filed after 3,500 turtles turned up injured or dead in the Gulf of Mexico in the year after the BP Oil Spill (April, 2010). [See below]

By law all but one group of American ocean-fishing shrimp boats must use TED nets. (Imported shrimp must also prove that their boats use TEDs.) The new proposal would include those boats currently exempted: shrimp boats that fish in bays and estuaries. Instead of using TED nets, these boats limited the amount of time they fished, but that time restriction on them appears not to have helped the turtles enough. The turtles died en masse.

While I think most fishermen want to do right by animals even at some cost to themselves, I hope that the shrimp boat owners in shallower waters don’t put up a big stink and derail the rule. It’s possible though. Here’s the backstory as described in a 2010 article in the NYTimes describing the massive deaths of sea turtles not long after the BP Oil Spill:

Shrimpers emerged as a prime suspect in the NOAA investigation when, after a round of turtle necropsies in early May, Dr. Stacy announced that more than half the carcasses had sediment in the airways or lungs — evidence of drowning. The only plausible explanation for such a high number of drowning deaths, he said, was, as he put it, “fisheries interaction.”

Environmentalists saw the findings as confirmation of their suspicions that shrimpers, taking advantage of the fact that the Coast Guard and other inspectors were busy with the oil spill, had disabled their turtle excluder devices.

The devices are so contentious that Louisiana law has long forbidden its wildlife and fisheries agents to enforce federal regulations on the devices. Last month, Gov. Bobby Jindal vetoed legislation that would have finally lifted the ban, citing the “challenges and issues currently facing our fishermen.” By contrast, Mississippi officials strengthened turtle protections by decreasing the allowable tow time for skimmers, posting observers on boats, and sending out pamphlets on turtle resuscitation.

Officials in both states say that turtles die in shrimp season even when shrimpers follow the law, from boat strikes and other accidents. They also say there have been far fewer shrimpers working since the spill, in part because many have hired out their boats to BP. That should mean fewer, not more, turtle deaths.

But there has also been illegal activity. In Louisiana, agents have seized more than 20,000 pounds of shrimp and issued more than 350 citations to commercial fishermen working in waters closed because of the oil spill. In Mississippi in June, three skimmer boats were caught exceeding legal tow times — one just hours after the shrimper had been given a handout explaining that the maximum time had been reduced, Lieutenant Armes said.

As for the piece of shrimp that Dr. Stacy found lodged in the turtle’s throat during the necropsy, it, too, pointed to shrimpers. A turtle is normally not quick enough to catch shrimp, Dr. Stacy said. Unless, of course, it is caught in a net with them.”

Please let NOAA Fisheries know by Feb 14 what you think of the rule (even if all you do is send them a link to this article). Please also do all you can to encourage conservative businessman Wilbur Ross to approve it. Maybe send him your message in a plastic water bottle?

A sea turtle will thank you…##

Here’s how the new net that releases turtles, sharks and other large animals works:

A Smidgen of Good News…And It Concerns a Trump

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Books, Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection, Politics of Conservation, Public Gardens and Parks | Leave a comment

This morning I read the relatively welcome news that Donald Trump the Younger “quashed a competing candidate [U.S. Rep Cathy Rodgers]” as Donald Trump the Elder’s nominee for U.S. Secretary of the Interior and led his father to instead nominate Montana Congressman Ryan Zinke. This is big news, given that the very conservative, evangelical Mrs. Rodgers is the highest ranking Republican woman in the Congress and has participated in “environmental work” in Congress since her election in 2005. In contrast, Mr. Zinke is practically new in Congress.

What did The Younger have against Ms. Rodgers? It appears that The Younger is “a hunter with a professed interest in land issues…a member of a sportsmen’s group, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers, that vigorously criticized Ms. Rodgers because of her support for selling off public land” [NYTimes, Dec. 16, 2016]. Indeed, BHA’s website offers lots of articles arguing against selling off public lands. How about this recent one: “Tell Your Congressman Where You Stand on Bad Public Land Transfer Deals”?

Hurrah for a smidgen of good news. It seems the Donald The Younger and the Queen Bee [me] might have something in common: land preservation, or at least not selling Federal land “just because”. Can it be? (Maybe I’ll join Backcountry Hunters & Anglers–only $25 for a membership.)

Donald the Younger’s ardent interest in hunting immediately brought to mind another wealthy hunter who called himself a conservationist: Teddy Roosevelt. Could it be possible that The Younger could become appreciated by people like me for urging his father to set aside more (!) land for national wildlife refuges, national parks, national forests, and national monuments? If it takes a wealthy hunter from Manhattan to speak up for bison, okay. Let’s hope. Cancel that. Let’s PRAY.

Donald the Younger’s interest made me also recall another beyond-wealthy “conservationist”: Laurence Spelman Rockefeller (1910-2004), on whom George Bush the Elder bestowed the Congressional Gold Medal in 1991. It was the first time the medal was ever given for contributions to conservation and historic preservation. The President praised “LSR” for “a life and works that would stand in summary of a century in which Americans had come to appreciate the very real problems of their environment, indeed of the world’s environment.” (President Bush did renew the Clean Air Act in 1990 even though conservatives didn’t want to, and he did appoint Bill Reilly, head of the World Wildlife Fund, as Administrator of the EPA, but that was about it for George’s environmental record.)

Laurence Rockefeller began as a conservationist and ended as an environmentalist. They are not the same thing, of course, as his biographer, Robin W Winks, points out in the excellent book, Laurence S. Rockefeller: Catalyst for Conservation. The former, conservation, “was a response to the destruction of the bison, the extinction of the passenger pigeon, the transformation of a once abundant land into barren and sterile soil through harmful farming practices. Its supporters included sportsmen, the great fishing clubs, and trophy hunters. Theodore Roosevelt was a conservationist. Conservationists established the first national park, Yellowstone, in the U.S. in 1872. They restocked streams, rivers…they argued for the protection of forests as habitat for wildlife and for the creation of wildlife refuges and for the study of breeding patterns and mating calls.”

Donald the Younger appears to be a conservationist. But perhaps, like Rockefeller, he will evolve into an environmentalist. “Environmentalism came to mean leaving the natural landscape alone as much as possible rather than reshaping it to man’s definitions of beauty; to building no roads, planting no alien trees, letting nature take its course insofar as possible. Environmentalism recognized human beings are part of the natural order and that they must learn to live within it rather than seeking to transform it. Environmentalism demanded hundreds of decisions as to what constitutes moral behavior…should one put out only those fires caused by man? But if man were part of nature, should not the fires of man also be left to burn? Environmentalism required more education, more planning, and therefore more interference with traditional lifestyles than conservationists would tolerate.” [Wink, p. 15]

Much of America (or at least the Trump group) wants to return to Ronald Reagan‘s America, which signifies a return to the 1980’s: “the slowest period of growth in the modern history of the nation’s national parks, the appointment of a secretary of the interior [James G. Watt] who opposed any additions to the system, the politicization of the National Park System Advisory Board, and more political appointments deeper into the ranks of the national parks than any other president.” [Wink, p. 94]

Into those perilous environmental waters we go. Nonetheless, Donald the Younger advised his father to appoint Zinke, a Montana Congressman who has a degree in geology and spent twenty-three years as a Navy Seal (not much time under the oceans, I see, instead mostly doing “special ops warfare” duty in Iraq and Kosovo) before becoming Montana’s sole U.S. Representative just two years ago, in 2014.

Zinke was busy in Congress: I count 19 bills that he introduced (none passed). Interestingly, in 2010, Zinke signed a letter calling global warming “a threat multiplier for instability in the most volatile regions of the world” and stating that “the clean energy and climate challenge is America’s new space race.” The letter spoke of “catastrophic” costs and “unprecedented economic consequences” that would result from failing to act on climate change and asked President Obama and Nancy Pelosi (then Speaker of the House) to champion sweeping clean-energy and climate legislation. But that was 2010 and now, now is the alt-right. Now is Trump.

Congressman Zinke “drifted” to the right as he ran for higher office, so we shall see what he brings to an agency of 70,000 employees other than what may be a desire to open more public land to “drill, baby, drill”.  On the other hand, there’s still that glimmer of hope that he is not ridiculously idealogical. He actually withdrew as a delegate to the Republican Presidential nominating convention in July 2016 because he objected to transferring Federal lands to state control. To this I say, “YES, you are right, Congressman. Be careful what you wish for.” But maybe he’s just a one-trick pony: get’s his shorts all wrapped up tight about keeping Federal lands Federal but those same Federal lands are open for sale.

But I digress from Donald the Younger. Let’s hope that he will take after Laurence Rockefeller. After all, the Rockefellers and the Trumps are neighbors on 5th Avenue…

Let’s hope Donald the Younger convinces Donald the Elder and Mr. Zinke to find value, as Rockefeller did, in balance between conservation and environmentalism, in developing resorts that are “eco” and sustainable, in revitalizing urban parks to add refreshing green to an otherwise commercial landscape, in saving fishing jobs long-term by putting critical ocean reefs off limits to fishing in the short-term, by understanding that selling Federal land has a long-term cost, and preserving historic places by investing money in their restoration.

Queen Bee can hope that Interior stays strong, can’t she? And please, Donald The Younger, please don’t shoot the bison.##

Back in Touch After the Summer–and the Election!

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Books, Conservation and Ecology | 1 Comment

Horrors! No posts since Memorial Day. But I’m back, driven by the election to closely follow what may happen to America’s land use and environmental institutions…all of which ultimately have an impact on our everyday lives, gardens, conservation areas, oceans, beaches, flora and fauna. In the politically conservative years to come, it will also be fascinating (hopefully not horrifying) to witness our country’s reaction to climate change.

Each of us is witnessing the intersection of these events and their policy implications. For example, John and I attended a wedding in Charleston, SC, on October 1st. The city’s tour guides spoke about plans to build a 20′ sea wall because the ocean is rising so quickly. Local TV news was broadcasting a weeklong special on the seacoast floods that occurred in 2015. And then five days after we left–the disaster of Hurricane Matthew and its weeks of flooding.

I know I feel so much safer here in Chicago. Even so, our town (Lake Forest) has written a Sustainability Plan. What does it obligate our family to do to pollute less?

I’m sure each of us has strong feelings about spending tax dollars on things like bridges along the outer banks of North Carolina that are continually washing away, or whether the Federal government “overreaches” when it buys land in the west for a National Wildlife Refuge [NWR]. Our family owns a house in Richmond, IL where Hackmatack, one of the nation’s most recent NWR’s, is located. Residents’ feelings run strong, for and against, this Federal designation, but until this year I would not have expected armed militias to stage a takeover. But if it can happen in Oregon, it could happen here. Yikes.

I want to be informed and knowledgeable on these issues.

I intend to highlight some of these stories in a way that allows us to think about what we would do as Administrator of the USEPA or Secretary of Interior, or simply if I want to call a Senator and make a comment about how our financial resources should be deployed on behalf of our natural resources. I hope to lace these stories with the history of our conservation and environmental protection movement. I have many books to recommend to you. My most recent favorite: Rightful Heritage by Douglas Brinkley. Did you know that Franklin Roosevelt’s passion was planting trees across the U.S.? (Hard not to think that planting trees is probably the way to “make America great again.”)

And of course, you and I will continue to share stories of photos of gardens and the gardeners who make them. Happy Thanksgiving! ##

img_0069

Oh, Brother, Here We Go…Pray for the Monarchs…the Whales…the Birds…and Us

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Birds, Bugs & Butterflies, Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection | 1 Comment

Did you ever read “Flight Behavior” by Barbara Kingsolver? It is a wonderful book. In one part, she vividly describes the eerie scene when snow and ice fall on the Monarchs nesting in their West Virginia (as I recall) woods.

But today comes reports that fiction has become fact. Extreme cold hit the Monarchs winter nesting site in Mexico. The pictures are frightening, but let’s have faith that these animals are hardy. But still, it’s bad news. The good news, however, is that both their numbers and the size of their woods increased this year.

But still…We were just in Costa Rica where the guides told us that the whales pretty much don’t migrate that far south anymore…the water up north is nice and warm and there’s no need for them to migrate further south than Baja. Not good for their economy and disturbing that eons of whale behavior is disrupted.

And in Panama, our guide–a birding expert–told us that the birds are already migrating north despite the fact that we (the north) could easily get hit by many more freezing days. That would mean catastrophe for birds coming north too soon.

Our awareness is critical to understanding, and understanding is critical to action. I beseech you to beware the politicians that say that they will destroy the EPA if they become President. Those same people care not for birds, butterflies, and ultimately, life on earth. They have more belief than I do that heaven is better.#

How Far From a River Do I Want to Build? Ask Some Regular Americans

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection | Leave a comment

NOTE: I wrote this a few weeks ago and sent it to the NYTimes in the hope that it might get published. Well, it didn’t (altho it would have been nice to hear “no” from them, but anyway). So here it is for you to read. I hope you like it better than they did!

If you want a great example of American “think” about property rights versus sensible land use policy in these United States, do what I did this morning. Open the NY Times, read scary stories about record flooding along the Mississippi River and its tributaries (and we thought 1993 floods were bad), send $100 to the American Red Cross, and then google, “how far from a river do I want to build?”.

The first result was on city-data.com, a website on which seven typical Americans posted their answers to the problematic distance-from-river question, originally posed by “potatosoup”:

From UCONN97 [probably a professor, albeit one that flunked spelling]: “I would start with your town. They should have fema maps for your location that can tell you flood info. I would find out if its even buildable before contacting a contractor. Also, be aware of how where you build may incure additional insurance costs. Finally, if you do decide to build on this land, I am hoping that the land slopes towards the water. I would incorporate a walkout basement type of design into your home. This way if there is a flood, your basement and mechanicals might take on water, but it might not neccessarily be a catastrophic loss.”

Okay, fairly rational answer, but UCONN97 assumes that there is some hilly terrain on which to perch potatosoup’s walkout basement and its no-big-costly-deal mechanical systems. That might be true at hilly UCONN, but probably not in the flatlands of the Midwest.

Next, from desertsun in Houston, Texas:

“I know for example in NJ it is illegal to build on a flood plain or what might be labeled  wetlands. And wetlands can be simply defined by the type of vegetation growing there.

Hopefully you are talking about a place not so burdened with govt communist restrictions.

Personally I would want to build over the river as a first choice or on the river edge as a 2nd choice.

For those who fear mother nature, build on high ground near as possible to the river. Get the house up some but to me building on piers such as you see in any coastal developed area is unattractive”.

I suspect that “desertsun” moved to Texas (which now allows you to pack your gun visibly) from New Jersey, that “place so burdened with govt communist restrictions.” Maybe desertsun believes that Texas will allow him to build a house “over the river as a first choice or on the river edge as a 2nd choice”. All I know for sure is this: Desertsun, please never ever get appointed to a local planning & zoning board, even in Texas.

“Cosmic” [location unnamed, but then again, he’s c.o.s.m.i.c.] offers us insight into the chicanery of the real estate industry when it comes to buying close to a river:

“The first part is buying the land and being led to believe that it is buildable. Lot of those games probably being run. Reason the land is for sale.

If there has been floods in the area also beware FEMA may have made the place a permit nightmare. That happened down on the Ohio River in some counties. They were pretty laid back in terms of regulations, permits, etc. Had some big floods, FEMA came in and then demanded very, very anal building regulations. Know this one contractor who moved up to my county. Sezs [sic] could not even think about making a living there, anything required a zillion pieces of paper.

Do not assume because the land is there it can be built on. NEVER, NEVER trust them realtor types. You may very well find out after the fact the horrible jam you are in. There may even be houses directly in the area, does not mean you can ever build another. Was out to see a buddy I grew up with couple weeks back in a small town, they have a creek running thru the town. Been a 22 year flood cycle, some very bad. FEMA again demanded some houses be moved, some were jacked up, there are empty lots all over. You never will get permission to build on any of them. Empty land may not be what it appears. FEMA really wants to tear them all down, big fights about it.

I would talk to knowledgeable locals first, hopefully some not in the trades or real estate business and get the history / local buzz of what is happening. Can try just the clerks in the Court House, chat them up a bit, ask would they buy that piece of property?

Go wary into danger. Too close to the wrong river is definitely standing [sic] into danger.”

“rubytue” posted a screenshot–the part about “never never trust them realtor types”–of cosmic’s reply, and then proceeded to tell a story about how the previous owner of her formerly double lot wanted to [and did!] sell off one lot separately even though the lot didn’t “perc”. Somehow rubytue conflated the dopey yet greedy landowner with “them realtor types”, but this mix-up in rubytue’s logic might have been predicted as rubytue lists her location as “sometimes Maryland, sometimes northern VA, depends on the day of the week”. Or maybe the flood threat.

But last, finally, a rationale man, mitch3 from eastern Washington, who posted his answer: “As far as possible, nowhere near it”. Bravo, Mitch! Alas, Mitch must be on a planning and zoning board, for like most land use officials he didn’t really want to make the tough call ie “NO BUILDING ALLOWED. EVER. DON’T EVEN THINK ABOUT IT. THAT MEANS NEVER. EVER NEVER. END OF STORY”. Mitch wavered, dammit. He followed his bold answer and lost all credibility with this pitiful capitulation: “IMHO [in my humble opinion], anyway”.

NY Times writer John Eligon identified the correct issue this morning: “the river levels [are] so high that vexing questions have again been raised about whether anything can be done to truly ease the threat.” Good question, answered by regular Americans uconn97, desertsun, cosmic, rubytue, and mitch3. They appear to hate govt communist restrictions more than they hate paying taxes for cleaning up potatosoup’s flooded riverfront house. IMHO, anyway.#

So Beautiful, So Scary, It’s the Future

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection, Plants | 3 Comments

Fall is in its glory, with beautiful weather days, clouds, pumpkins and leaf colors surrounding us here in Chicago.

Chicago pumpkins

Revel in this loveliness, dear readers, because Climate Change is with us everywhere always. Last Saturday, I attended a seminar at the Chicago Botanic Garden. The subject? A scientific study of which trees we should be planting because they are well suited to….future heat levels in the Chicago region. Here’s some winners: American Hornbeam [Carpinus caroliniana] ‘Firespire’, Kentucky Coffeetree [Gymnocladus dioicus] ‘Top Hat’, Miyabe Maple [Acer miyabei] ‘State Street’. Here’s a loser: White oak. My heart weeps to think this tree may be gone from Chicago by 2050.

As I write, the biggest hurricane EVER is looming down on wonderful Manzanillo, Mexico, which we once had the pleasure of visiting, bringing with it 12″ of rain across the American Gulf Coast. 2015 is the hottest year on record. The oceans are already three degrees warmer than the 20th century average (and it takes a lot of heat to heat up an entire ocean), and drought will mean MILLIONS will be starving in Africa. India and Pakistan hit 118 degrees last spring, leaving no water supply. Thousands of people died. Did we even KNOW THAT? (Pet peeve: TV weather reports never show international maps, as if no one lives in foreign countries. Even Canada doesn’t show up on the TV news.)

But 25 “red” states are suing the Federal government for trying to reduce emissions via regulations to be published by the EPA today. It’s a disingenuous ploy to seem like they are saving coal mining jobs since most states** are preparing plans to do the right thing, climate wise, and meet the regulations thru their own cap-and-trade programs. (**Hard-core Governors that are suing the Feds without creating their own air quality plans are Texas, Louisiana, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Oklahoma.)

I’m grateful to live in Chicago, which seems fairly insulated from the big environmental disasters. But the “hot” news from elsewhere makes me want to either pull the blankets over my head and hide OR do something pro-active. I live in a big house (actually, two houses), own three cars (none battery powered), and own numerous gas-driven tractors, lawnmowers, chain saws and leaf blowers. Which means that I’m more responsible in thought (admission: I think electricity is the best invention ever) and deed for bleaching the coral animals than the average guy, although not anywhere as bad as the Koch brothers, the Tennessee Valley Authority (yes, the Federal government’s own power plants), or Exxon Mobil. Their coal companies power my house and their refineries power my vehicles. Moi? Mea culpa.

Here’s a great Forbes article that explains the big polluters and the trade-offs we make.

No matter how many (heat tolerant) trees I plant, it’s time for me to say “no” to gasoline and coal. Maybe one less person will starve or one more coral will live because I didn’t blow the leaves away quite so fast or (gasp) raked and composted the leaves. Less air conditioning and “cleaner” cars. Ya think?##

Sounds like I’m singing the blues today. Here’s some “blues”, in recent photographs…

P1190508

P1190511

 

P1190527

P1190543

It All Adds Up…or…Plants of the World, Unite!

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Birds, Bugs & Butterflies, Conservation and Ecology | 3 Comments

I think one of the best things about life on earth is the NY Times. I’ve been reading it daily–and fairly closely–every day since I was a teenager.

There is so much information in every issue that it can make my brains hurt. And since there is not enough room in my cranium (please no remarks) to store all this written material, I am compelled to share the paper’s good and fascinating information with…you. From time to time, that is. I won’t pester you with doomsday too often, promise.

Here’s some recent good stuff that relates to gardening, which relates to conservation, and animals, and minerals and health and capitalism and government and, well, to my life. And to your’s.

For example, an example of animal conservation. You will recall, no doubt, that our 19th and early 20th century cowboy ancestors thought the Prairie Chicken so delicious that they shot dead one million birds from the tallgrass prairies that lined the Gulf of Mexico in Louisiana and Texas. They probably killed ’em all in just one day. Or maybe two. Anyway, it’s 2015 and now a TOTAL (!) of 104 birds struggle to survive at the Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge in Eagle Lake Texas. Despite the best efforts of the US Fish & Wildlife Service, the chicks that they had carefully and fairly recently hatched were dying.

Why? Because, the NYTimes tell us, an invasive species–red fire ants–“were decimating the insect population of the prairie. While adults eat plants and insects, the chicks dine primarily on insects, [so] the chicks were starving to death”. The good news is that “exterminating the fire ants and adding more plants that attract insects in the refuge has helped.” Last year, 60% of the chicks survived. Sadly, though, “a storm dumped more than 10 inches of rain on the refuge and the new chicks drowned or died of exposure”. Can you spell, “climate change”?

Next, the NYTimes leads us to the war between organic companies and the Monsanto regarding GMO labeling on the food we eat. The Federal government requires any product labeled “organic” to be free of ingredients produced from GMO seeds. On the flip side of that coin, Monsanto hires many professors to testify against the labeling horror in states that might want to follow the Federal  effort with their own labeling legislation. [Since consumers now doubt the profe$$or$, Monsanto’s advertising is soon going to feature more believable “mommy farmers”, but I digress.] But since the “organic movement” doesn’t feed the world or make billions in profits, the Agriculture Department in 2014 “approved GMO soybeans and cottonseed designed by Monsanto and treated with Dow-produced herbicide”.

Let’s keep going here. While the Feds or states don’t make most food companies disclose what’s actually in our food, the Federal government will now allow companies to say “made without ractopamine”, a chemical given pigs and chickens and some beef so that the animals can gain muscle weight while using fewer calories. Did you ever know about this practice before today? (I didn’t.) You want to know just how bad this stuff is? The Chinese won’t let us bring pigs or chickens into China because they don’t trust it. The Chinese! Now that explains why the big boys, like Tyson, are all of a sudden eager to have the Feds create a “made without ractopamine” label…they want to sell their animals to China (and to the EU and Russia and all the others that ban ractopamine.) So it was really not the organic crowd that got this label labelled…it was the mega-ag fellas.

Stay with me here. Can any of my readers imagine CROPS (ie plants) that don’t die after being (accidentally) sprayed by RoundUp? Well, okay, it’s old news that we eat soybeans and corn which are genetically engineered to withstand RoundUp. The new news is that the Ag Dept has approved corn and soybeans that can withstand spraying with 2-4 D. 2-4 D? OMG, do you remember Agent Orange?! Here’s the grim facts and “government speak” of this craziness:

“The Agriculture Department, in its environmental analysis, predicted that approval of the crops would lead to a 200 percent to 600 percent increase in the use of 2,4-D nationally by 2020. But it said analysis of the effects of that increased use was the responsibility of the E.P.A. The Agriculture Department said ITS [emphasis mine] approval depended mainly on whether the crops would harm other plants.” 

EPA is whether humans are poisoned. Ag is whether plants are poisoned. This is why people hate government.

Now, just in case you worry about human trafficking or slavery or child soldiers, as the State Department does, the NYTimes tells us there is a 356-page disclosure rule via Dodd-Frank that requires our companies to disclose “conflict minerals” in their products (like frozen shrimp from Thailand sold by Costco or tin that gives Party City’s balloons their sheen).

So, here’s an idea. If we can require such an onerous disclosure rule that probably has little real impact on slavery (compared with, say, paying decent wages), can’t we know that the food we eat was made with seeds resistant to the chemicals that kill the insects that kill the Prairie Chickens or the milkweed that feeds Monarch butterflies or the herbicide that killed people that lived or soldiered in Vietnam? Just sayin’.

Gardening these days requires a lot of thought.##

PS Here’s some good news: McDonalds, which uses 2 billion eggs annually, wants to let their hens be cage-free. This will take ten years to accomplish, but hey. Free the hens! Free the hens!

chickens

 

 

 

UP in the Garden, UP in the Prairie, UP in the Lake

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Birds, Bugs & Butterflies, Conservation and Ecology, Plants | 4 Comments

It’s the end of March and the weather has been down (a horrible cold blustery day last Sunday, March 29) and UP (today is 60 and sunny). I heard a radio report  that ships won’t be able to get to Burns Harbor, IN for another two weeks because the Lakes are still too frozen. But out in the the gardens, it’s fun to notice hints of color popping UP thru the soil. And yesterday was, “Drop Everything Day! It’s perfect for the prairie!” so off we went to the farm to be pyromaniacs. Fire it UP! And then on the way home, two geese in Redwing Slough in Antioch gave me a great big chuckle…Bottoms UP!

P1140753

P1140754
P1140757

P1140759

 

P1140761


IMG_6287

IMG_6284
IMG_6276

IMG_6292

HAPPY EASTER TO ALL WHO LOVE PLANTS AND ANIMALS.##

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading Up on Land Use Political History

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Birds, Bugs & Butterflies, Books, Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection | 2 Comments

This has nothing to do with anything “gardening”, but if you want to read an interesting historical story, check this Lincoln photograph archive article out…Fascinating “garage sale” yarn. Hmm, I guess it is a “conservation”-related story…

Which brings me to this “conservation” insight. I have decided to read every book available on the politics and history of land conservation. Right now I am simultaneously reading The Swamp: The Everglades, Florida, and the Politics of Paradise by Michael Grunwald and Politics, Pollution, and Pandas: An Environmental Memoir by Russell E. Train, who was President of the World Wildlife Fund but was also a key Nixon-era EPA director and Interior Dept deputy. Before that, he headed the [new in 1969] Council on Environmental Quality, which oversaw the law requiring Federal agencies (like the US Army Corps of Engineers, did you know it has 37,000 employees?!) to publish Environmental Impact Statements [EIS]. I’ve always liked this land use law stuff: my Master’s Thesis was about the value of EIS’s…

Anywho, the two books are a good combination, because one book gives the State/Florida angle on “saving” the Everglades and the other gives the Federal perspective. And it’s really interesting to think about names “from the past” like John Erlichman [who “put the kibosh” on the Everglades-killing Miami Jetport and was a Seattle land use attorney before going to DC], Nixon himself [who wasn’t actually personally interested in the environment but initiated hugely-important environmental protections as a political move to get or stay ahead of the Democrats], VP Al Gore versus House Speaker Newt Gingrich (whose 2007 book, Contract with the Earth, is on my reading list.)

And the walk down memory lane also includes deja-vu nuggets like, “[1995] didn’t seem like a very good time for political consensus. In Washington, partisanship had become so venomous that the Federal government shut down for a week over a budget dispute…The GOP majority began crusading to roll back environmental regulations…House Majority Whip Tom DeLay compared the EPA to the Gestapo…”. Or this excerpt from Train’s book: “In 1968, oil was discovered in recoverable quantities on the North Slope of Alaska…[and] the pipeline was being called the largest private construction project in history. I [Russell Train] was determined that we not simply accept the assurances of the oil companies but that we exercise due diligence about possible adverse environmental effects…[Studies, EISs, lawsuits followed…] While there was the inevitable claim of unnecessary delay, it was basically time well spent. As the president of ARCO Oil later said, “had the pipeline been built according to original specifications, the result would have been a disaster, environmentally and economically”. Plus ca change, n’est-ce pas? [By the way, here’s what EPA said in Feb 2015 about the Keystone XL Pipeline.]

PS While poking around on Federal websites, I found this “landscaping guidance for Federal facilities”, which is as good as anything I’ve seen to guide municipal decisions too. You can bet I’m sending it on to the City of Lake Forest which is about to hold hearings (Again. Long story.) on letting Whole Foods cut down 400 oak trees and demolish a landmarked mansion to build a new store and parking on Route 60. UGH UGH UGH. And here’s the Federal guidance on helping pollinators, such as honeybees, butterflies, birds, insects, and bats. Here’s one suggestion I have for helping pollinators: restore water to the Everglades! And don’t cut down 8 acres of oak trees in Lake Forest!#

Here’s a great deal!

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Birds, Bugs & Butterflies, Conservation and Ecology, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Weedpatch Subscribers: I hope we have 100% participation in this lovely offer from Kay MacNeil to receive Milkweed seeds. Just send her $2 and a SASE. (I just did. And I will find a great spot along a roadway or park to toss the seed. This is my ‘suburban guerrilla’ planting for pollinators campaign.) But I digress. Here’ s Kay’s offer:

“Hi, Rommy. I am the chairman of the Garden Clubs of Illinois President’s Project, Milkweed For Monarchs.  This is an effort to educate gardeners and others to spread more Milkweed around their yards and community. The idea is that next fall we will harvest and clean milkweed seed  and give it to IDOT and hopefully also the Tollroad.  I also send 3 kinds of milkweed seed to anyone who can’t find another source if they send me a stamped self addressed business envelope with $2. If you go to Milkweed for Monarchs for information, you will also find my new  How To Become A Caterpillar Mother” information”.

Kay’s address is: Kay MacNeil – Milkweed for Monarchs, 689 Golf Club Lane, Frankfort, Il 60423.

Thanks for helping the Monarch Butterflies! And don’t forget to plant dill or fennel or parsley for the Swallowtails.#