A Smidgen of Good News…And It Concerns a Trump

This morning I read the relatively welcome news that Donald Trump the Younger “quashed a competing candidate [U.S. Rep Cathy Rodgers]” as Donald Trump the Elder’s nominee for U.S. Secretary of the Interior and led his father to instead nominate Montana Congressman Ryan Zinke. This is big news, given that the very conservative, evangelical Mrs. Rodgers is the highest ranking Republican woman in the Congress and has participated in “environmental work” in Congress since her election in 2005. In contrast, Mr. Zinke is practically new in Congress.

What did The Younger have against Ms. Rodgers? It appears that The Younger is “a hunter with a professed interest in land issues…a member of a sportsmen’s group, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers, that vigorously criticized Ms. Rodgers because of her support for selling off public land” [NYTimes, Dec. 16, 2016]. Indeed, BHA’s website offers lots of articles arguing against selling off public lands. How about this recent one: “Tell Your Congressman Where You Stand on Bad Public Land Transfer Deals”?

Hurrah for a smidgen of good news. It seems the Donald The Younger and the Queen Bee [me] might have something in common: land preservation, or at least not selling Federal land “just because”. Can it be? (Maybe I’ll join Backcountry Hunters & Anglers–only $25 for a membership.)

Donald the Younger’s ardent interest in hunting immediately brought to mind another wealthy hunter who called himself a conservationist: Teddy Roosevelt. Could it be possible that The Younger could become appreciated by people like me for urging his father to set aside more (!) land for national wildlife refuges, national parks, national forests, and national monuments? If it takes a wealthy hunter from Manhattan to speak up for bison, okay. Let’s hope. Cancel that. Let’s PRAY.

Donald the Younger’s interest made me also recall another beyond-wealthy “conservationist”: Laurence Spelman Rockefeller (1910-2004), on whom George Bush the Elder bestowed the Congressional Gold Medal in 1991. It was the first time the medal was ever given for contributions to conservation and historic preservation. The President praised “LSR” for “a life and works that would stand in summary of a century in which Americans had come to appreciate the very real problems of their environment, indeed of the world’s environment.” (President Bush did renew the Clean Air Act in 1990 even though conservatives didn’t want to, and he did appoint Bill Reilly, head of the World Wildlife Fund, as Administrator of the EPA, but that was about it for George’s environmental record.)

Laurence Rockefeller began as a conservationist and ended as an environmentalist. They are not the same thing, of course, as his biographer, Robin W Winks, points out in the excellent book, Laurence S. Rockefeller: Catalyst for Conservation. The former, conservation, “was a response to the destruction of the bison, the extinction of the passenger pigeon, the transformation of a once abundant land into barren and sterile soil through harmful farming practices. Its supporters included sportsmen, the great fishing clubs, and trophy hunters. Theodore Roosevelt was a conservationist. Conservationists established the first national park, Yellowstone, in the U.S. in 1872. They restocked streams, rivers…they argued for the protection of forests as habitat for wildlife and for the creation of wildlife refuges and for the study of breeding patterns and mating calls.”

Donald the Younger appears to be a conservationist. But perhaps, like Rockefeller, he will evolve into an environmentalist. “Environmentalism came to mean leaving the natural landscape alone as much as possible rather than reshaping it to man’s definitions of beauty; to building no roads, planting no alien trees, letting nature take its course insofar as possible. Environmentalism recognized human beings are part of the natural order and that they must learn to live within it rather than seeking to transform it. Environmentalism demanded hundreds of decisions as to what constitutes moral behavior…should one put out only those fires caused by man? But if man were part of nature, should not the fires of man also be left to burn? Environmentalism required more education, more planning, and therefore more interference with traditional lifestyles than conservationists would tolerate.” [Wink, p. 15]

Much of America (or at least the Trump group) wants to return to Ronald Reagan‘s America, which signifies a return to the 1980’s: “the slowest period of growth in the modern history of the nation’s national parks, the appointment of a secretary of the interior [James G. Watt] who opposed any additions to the system, the politicization of the National Park System Advisory Board, and more political appointments deeper into the ranks of the national parks than any other president.” [Wink, p. 94]

Into those perilous environmental waters we go. Nonetheless, Donald the Younger advised his father to appoint Zinke, a Montana Congressman who has a degree in geology and spent twenty-three years as a Navy Seal (not much time under the oceans, I see, instead mostly doing “special ops warfare” duty in Iraq and Kosovo) before becoming Montana’s sole U.S. Representative just two years ago, in 2014.

Zinke was busy in Congress: I count 19 bills that he introduced (none passed). Interestingly, in 2010, Zinke signed a letter calling global warming “a threat multiplier for instability in the most volatile regions of the world” and stating that “the clean energy and climate challenge is America’s new space race.” The letter spoke of “catastrophic” costs and “unprecedented economic consequences” that would result from failing to act on climate change and asked President Obama and Nancy Pelosi (then Speaker of the House) to champion sweeping clean-energy and climate legislation. But that was 2010 and now, now is the alt-right. Now is Trump.

Congressman Zinke “drifted” to the right as he ran for higher office, so we shall see what he brings to an agency of 70,000 employees other than what may be a desire to open more public land to “drill, baby, drill”.  On the other hand, there’s still that glimmer of hope that he is not ridiculously idealogical. He actually withdrew as a delegate to the Republican Presidential nominating convention in July 2016 because he objected to transferring Federal lands to state control. To this I say, “YES, you are right, Congressman. Be careful what you wish for.” But maybe he’s just a one-trick pony: get’s his shorts all wrapped up tight about keeping Federal lands Federal but those same Federal lands are open for sale.

But I digress from Donald the Younger. Let’s hope that he will take after Laurence Rockefeller. After all, the Rockefellers and the Trumps are neighbors on 5th Avenue…

Let’s hope Donald the Younger convinces Donald the Elder and Mr. Zinke to find value, as Rockefeller did, in balance between conservation and environmentalism, in developing resorts that are “eco” and sustainable, in revitalizing urban parks to add refreshing green to an otherwise commercial landscape, in saving fishing jobs long-term by putting critical ocean reefs off limits to fishing in the short-term, by understanding that selling Federal land has a long-term cost, and preserving historic places by investing money in their restoration.

Queen Bee can hope that Interior stays strong, can’t she? And please, Donald The Younger, please don’t shoot the bison.##

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Books, Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection, Politics of Conservation, Public Gardens and Parks

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