Monthly Archives: November 2013

Monthly Archives: November 2013

Mississippi Flyway Used by Half of All North American Birds! Hear more next Monday…

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection, Events, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Lake County Audubon Society welcomes all to attend a very important presentation on Monday, December 2, 7:30 pm, at the Libertyville Village Hall, 118 W. Cook Street, Libertyville, IL. Chris Canfield, Vice President of the Mississippi Flyway and former VP Gulf of Mexico Conservation and Restoration, will discuss the National Audubon Society’s Mississippi Flyway, the role it plays in Audubon’s integrated conservation model, and the essential role that local Audubon chapters play in advancing National Audubon’s conservation priorities and success stories for …

Butterflies, Bees and Trees: What’s Your Legacy?

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Birds, Bugs & Butterflies, Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection, Plants, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Yesterday I was ferreting through a pile of my husband’s “paperwork” and came across a lost treasure: a faded pamphlet of “The Man Who Planted Hope and Grew Happiness”, written by French novelist, Jean Giono (1895-1970) and first published by Vogue Magazine in March, 1954. This is the most precious and inspirational true story you could ever read. I read it first on a sunny summer afternoon when I had the honor of being able to visit the Wisconsin farm …

Woe the Ornamental Pear Tree: Invasive, But Does It Make the “Invasive List”?

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection, Plants, Uncategorized | 6 Comments

Trouble’s brewing over the fate of Ornamental Pear [Pyrus calleryana] trees. It seems that this tree (you may know its cultivar names such as Aristocrat, Bradford, Chanticleer, Cleveland Select, Redspire, Trinity, or Jaczam) is becoming invasive in northeastern Illinois. In fact, Cathy McGlynn, coordinator of the Northeast Illinois Invasive Plant Partnership, told me that attempts to regulate its sale were recently proposed because conservationists fear that “it may become the next Buckthorn.” In fact, just last week–presumably because nurserymen (with …

Restoration Ecology: Bad Signs, Good Books, and Henry Cowles

Posted on by weedpatchgazette in Conservation and Ecology, Environmental Protection, Historic Places, Plants, Uncategorized | 4 Comments

I am not a biologist nor a botanist, merely an interested gardener, but our trip to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore did offer a few “head scratchers”. For example, why is it that so often I notice signs like this…   …which are then surrounded by non-native plants (in this case, coreopsis and agastache)? In our town, the “Restoration Area: Do Not Mow” signs posted on the publicly-owned Lake Michigan bluff are apparently markers for inviting rampant noxious weeds to …

The Indiana Dunes National Seashore: Homes and Homesteads

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Have you been to the Indiana Dunes National Seashore lately? In October, we took the short drive to Indiana to tour the “Houses of Tomorrow” from the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair: Century of Progress that were hauled by barge to Indiana’s lakeshore as part of a housing developer’s promotion. The Federal government now owns the homes (located near Beverly Shores) but leases them to people who agree to restore them to their 1933 “glory”. This is easier said than done. Seems …

Astounding Mosaiculture! Which One is your Favorite?

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I hope you will open this link and be ASTONISHED at human ingenuity. http://myvirtualgarden2.blogspot.com/2013/09/mosaiculture-exhibition.html?m=1 Thank you to Courtney Dobyns, landscape designer in Vermont, for sending weedpatchgazette.com this display of sculptures in Montreal. Three of these models struck home with me: first, I saw the exact big brown incredibly shaggy dog today at the mailboxes store; second, my husband used his chainsaw to carve an Easter Island sculpture out of the red oak that fell down two summers ago; and third, …